Politics, the Creative Process, and 90s Musical Jams: An Interview with Jesse Meadows from the Wardrobe Ensemble

Original Interview: The Reviews Hub

Education Education Education

Education, Education, Education: then, a nineties political mantra, now a nostalgia-fest of nineties music, Tamagotchis, and timely political poignancy in a riotously funny and reflective piece of theatre from the Bristol-based Wardrobe Ensemble. Putting politics in the comprehensive, the play is a charming charge through the hopeful optimism of teachers and children alike in the aftermath of Tony Blair’s election, as well as the changes and truths that only came with time and perspective in the twenty years that have passed. Company member Jesse Meadows talks politics, the creative process, and 90s musical jams.

The play is the perfect mix of 90s nostalgia, political poignancy, and feel-good fun, so what’s it like to perform night after night? ‘It’s as important to us that people have a good time and a good night out at the theatre! Those points that we’re hitting that make people go, ‘oh God!’, those poignant moments, we can reach people through the funny, and through making them laugh.’

It’s also a period piece, and one that’s ‘very much set in the nineties and that’s very fun to play with.’ With everything from Cool Britannia to Britpop, Tamagotchis to Take That, ‘all the references we make are funny now because they’re set in this world of fake nostalgia’, and it’s fun to ‘take people on that memory journey with us’. And twenty years is lifetime in politics and pop culture. ‘We thought a lot about 1997. We were really interested in the hope and positivity, the promise and excitement’ of its politics, and there are representations of that in the play: ‘we put up Union Jack flags everywhere because that was really ‘in’, just think of Geri in the Union Jack dress! But now, you put Union Jacks up and people cringe. Pride for your country has just totally flipped. It feels like a divided country now, whereas then it felt like coming together.’

While politics polarise, pop culture has the power to unite: in the words of hapless headteacher Hugh, in light of the election the teachers must remain politically impartial in all classes, but, ‘we did win Eurovision, so talk about that as much as you wish’, and it’s something Jesse echoes, as ‘things like winning the Eurovision Song Contest, these are the things that unite us as a country’.

This playful approach to politics is also found in their creative process, despite the divisive events that were going on whilst devising Education, Education, Education.  Continue reading “Politics, the Creative Process, and 90s Musical Jams: An Interview with Jesse Meadows from the Wardrobe Ensemble”

Review: Wardrobe Ensemble’s Education, Education, Education

Original review: Underdog Reviews

Education Education Education

90s nostalgia cut through with political poignancy

Twenty years ago, in 1997, it was a time of Take That, Tamagotchis and British teachers celebrating in the staff room after Tony Blair and the Labour party were elected with the mantra ‘education, education, education’. Wardrobe Ensemble’s eponymous play unpacks the politics of this cultural moment with wit, warmth, and winning charm, exploring the optimism and the realism that cuts through the 90s nostalgia with political poignancy.

Set in a well-meaning but not-quite-comprehensive comprehensive secondary school in the immediate aftermath of the election, the Ensemble places the individual at the centre of political change. From the highly-strung but ever-hopeful holistic teacher hopelessly losing control of her classes to the stroppy student trying to petition her teachers for a place on the school trip. Wardrobe Ensemble is unmistakably a devising company, with each character so well developed in communication and movement that even when saying the same things or doing the same dance moves, the characterisation is unmistakable, and the creative doubling of each teacher as a student sharing the same name as their actor counterpart is clearly distinct.

As the plot balances the optimism and pessimism of a new political landscape, the play is a practiced blend of the lifelike and the stylised: Continue reading “Review: Wardrobe Ensemble’s Education, Education, Education”